Sun (2016) poster
7.0
Your Rating: 0/10
Ratings: 7.0/10 from 130 users
# of Watchers: 626
Reviews: 2 users
Ranked #91212
Popularity #10568
Watchers 130

Set in the early 21st century with the population decimated by bio terror. Two kinds of humans now exist. One is the Nokusu who were infected with a virus but survived, consequently they carry an antibody. Most are young, healthy and have high intelligence, but they have a high sensitivity to ultraviolet rays and are active mostly during the night. The other group are the Kyurio. They survived by never having the virus. The Nokusu discriminates against the Kyurio. Tetsuhiko Okudera is a Kyurio. He was born in a poor village. He isn't happy with being a Kyurio and wishes he could be a Nokusu. Yui Ikuta is Tetsuhiko’s childhood friend. She tries to revive the poor village. Edit Translation

  • English
  • Español
  • magyar / magyar nyelv
  • dansk
  • Country: Japan
  • Type: Movie
  • Release Date: Apr 23, 2016
  • Duration: 2 hr. 9 min.
  • Score: 7.0 (scored by 130 users)
  • Ranked: #91212
  • Popularity: #10568
  • Content Rating: 13+ - Teens 13 or older

Cast & Credits

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Sun (2016) photo
Sun (2016) photo
Sun (2016) photo
Sun (2016) photo
Sun (2016) photo
Sun (2016) photo

Reviews

Completed
David C Mahler
4 people found this review helpful
Oct 14, 2020
Completed 0
Overall 9.0
Story 8.5
Acting/Cast 9.0
Music 8.0
Rewatch Value 7.0
This review may contain spoilers

Fun and fascinating, occasionally thrilling, and ultimately invigorating.

Yu Irie directs a talented cast led by Ryunosuke Kamiki (As the Gods Will, BAKUMAN) in this quietly riveting, suspenseful drama about humanity at the brink of desperation. Challenging to watch at times, The Sun is not afraid to explore the tensions and inhibitions of a society at breaking point.

The world building and characterisation are superb and never feel heavy-handed. We’re exploring some familiar allegories, but the Japanese setting produces a fresh take on the traditional versus technological. The Nox are productive and technologically capable, yet they are more rigid and emotionless. Despite their smiles they seem almost brainwashed. On the other hand the Curios live in quaint Japanese countryside towns abundant in nature and steeped in tradition. They live in a more natural world, and the only negative influence on their way of life happens to be the bureaucratic hold of those who’ve taken power for their own.

The technical side of the production is equally flawless, and oftentimes the cinematography is breathtaking. One scene in particular pulls out all the stops, a one shot which utilises every element of filmmaking to progress the story and tie together a number of narrative threads in a seamless and thrilling way. Tetsuhiko’s uncle returns to the village years after murdering a Nox guard, tainting the name of the village and making its people a target for the dominant group. At the same time Tetsuhiko arrives home with a wounded Nox, a young man he’s been befriending as he plans to enter the lottery. It’s hard to describe without spoilers, but as the two threads clash we see character blocking, camera movement, framing, quadrants and planes all employed pitch-perfectly. It’s cinematic magic.

The Sun delivers as a gripping and relatable story with a post-apocalyptic sci-fi flavour. Fun and fascinating, occasionally thrilling, and ultimately invigorating.

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Completed
midgargirl
2 people found this review helpful
Oct 14, 2020
Completed 0
Overall 8.5
Story 8.0
Acting/Cast 10
Music 6.5
Rewatch Value 5.5

The theme and meaning of this movie leave you with something to ponder about.

Pure Machiavellian genius, The Sun is a unique take on a not-quite oppressed society, equally heartwarming and heart breaking, scenes of tragedy splashed with black comedy and absurdist humor that only the Japanese are capable of delivering with such 12-gauge impact. An ensemble cast, excellent performance; there were some moments in the film that were very emotional. Add some smart framing and crisp cinematography, and you've got one hell of a package. The theme and meaning of this movie leave you with something to ponder about.
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Details

  • Movie: Sun
  • Country: Japan
  • Release Date: Apr 23, 2016
  • Duration: 2 hr. 9 min.
  • Content Rating: 13+ - Teens 13 or older

Statistics

  • Score: 7.0 (scored by 130 users)
  • Ranked: #91212
  • Popularity: #10568
  • Watchers: 626

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