Details

  • Movie: Little Big Soldier
  • Country: China
  • Release Date: Feb 14, 2010
  • Duration: 1 hr. 36 min.
  • Rating: Not Yet Rated

Statistics

  • Score: 8.0 (scored by 441 users)
  • Ranked: #1191
  • Popularity: #3508
  • Watchers: 689

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Little Big Soldier
8.0
Your Rating: 0/10
Ratings: 8.0/10 from 441 users
# of Watchers: 689
Reviews: 2 users
Ranked #1191
Popularity #3508
Watchers 441

Set during The Warring States Period (475 B.C. - 221 B.C.), an old soldier from the state of Liang kidnaps the young general of an enemy state and takes him on a long journey to collect the reward. The old soldier hopes to use to the reward to retire and become a farmer. During their journey they encounter pursuers, abductors, swindlers and other difficulties. Add Synopsis In Spanish

  • Country: China
  • Type: Movie
  • Release Date: Feb 14, 2010
  • Duration: 1 hr. 36 min.
  • Score: 8.0 (scored by 441 users)
  • Ranked: #1191
  • Popularity: #3508
  • Rating: Not Yet Rated

Cast & Credits

Reviews

Completed
mysecretsoul
7 people found this review helpful
Nov 29, 2013
Completed 0
Overall 8.0
Story 8.0
Acting/Cast 9.0
Music 8.0
Rewatch Value 8.0
Conceptualized more than 20 years ago by Jackie Chan himself, Little Big Soldier bears strong evidence of his involvement down to the bones. Many viewers remember him as the superior action star, a unique martial artist whose talents have propelled him far beyond the impending twilight of his physical prime. Others yet know him as one half of a bickering Hollywood bromance or two. This film combines both perceptions with delightful flourish, making for a watch that will keep viewers engaged (and Chan fans proud).

Most media set during the Warring States period tend to pack on backstabbing politics, tragic romance, and lofty themes. Don't expect such things here. Little Big Soldier never attempts pretense, content to remain a straightforward buddy/road-trip fusion with a simple message. Its narrative follows a "small potatoes" conscript who has the luck to capture an enemy general. We mostly follow the pair in their dangerous trek across the Chinese wilderness, facing down nature and war-born troubles.

But the mood generally stays light. Continuing in the spirit of many Chan vehicles, even action sequences are infused with comedy. Add to this finely choreographed fights and appealing situations; the result is an amusing and fast-paced film, if an uncomplicated one. If issues exist, they manifest themselves within the last ten or so minutes. The outcome seems to betray the established mood of the film and (while groundwork for the ending is laid), it nearly takes the air out of the entire experience.

Jackie Chan may come to mind more for physical prowess, but his performance as the soldier is exceptional. Cowardly and street-smart, this character is startlingly deep and explored with careful maturity. Wang Lee Hom acts well and is believable as the general; though alone he does not sparkle, his chemistry with Chan is insanely dynamic. Any scene they have together is utterly wonderful; I would watch Little Big Soldier again for this aspect alone. Definitely watch this if you like bromance, unique action, and of course, Jackie Chan. Other highlights include: incredible scenery, sharp cinematography, and a cute blooper reel during the credits.

If you pay attention to music, the orchestrations are high quality. Of those that stand memorable, vocals by the lone female character and the soldier are best. I don't think I'll ever forget the lyrics, "a big road leads to my home," and perhaps you won't either.

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Completed
KiaSoul
3 people found this review helpful
Apr 13, 2014
Completed 0
Overall 10
Story 10
Acting/Cast 10
Music 10
Rewatch Value 10
I’m sure there are many versions and/or variations of how the seven kingdoms eventually become China. IMHO Little, Big Soldier is as beautiful a version/variation as there is.

According to the film, the seven kingdoms became China because a farmer and a prince exchanged roles in terms of their deepest held convictions. The farmer wants to live, embracing peace, understanding, and sensible compromise. The prince wants to live too but to live proudly and honorably even if that means war and death.

It’s hard not to empathize with the farmer, but by film’s end, as the credits role, you can’t help but to see how right the prince was to do as he had done despite the destruction of his army and the suffering of his people. To live in peace means very little without pride and honor. So much for the film’s thematic content. Cinematography-wise, the film is first rate, even breathtaking. The OST is impressionable, and the acting...Well what can I say? Jackie Chan is so likable, and he was especially so in his moments of repose when he would persuade Wang Leehom, who plays the Wei crowned prince, of life's preciousness.

A fellow reviewer mentioned that this film was a labor of love, that Jackie Chan had spent decades trying to get it on film. I'm grateful that the "greatest action star in film" was as stubborn and as dogged as he was.

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